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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Why Knot:
Tying It All Together for Spring

Photographed by Hanna Tveite

No zip, snap, or button can match the elegance of even the most hastily tied bow. Whether in the form of a waist-cinching belt or a decorative knot, tied fastenings are appealing in their simplicity, evoking the grace of classical drapery and the ease of a bathrobe. The spring 2016 collections of Altuzarra, Protagonist, Nehera, and Proenza Schouler each embrace these elements in a distinctive way. Prepare to redefine the phrase “fit to be tied.”

In a serene spring collection inspired by the work of photographer Charles Fréger and his own Basque roots, designer Joseph Altuzarra celebrates “the beauty of materials which are close to nature,” he says. “Things which are not fussy.” Fabrics such as unbleached linen are accented by ties that are at once artful and easy, without sacrificing Altuzarra’s signature seductiveness. A wrap-style skirt is sharpened by contrast topstitching.

For Protagonist, this spring is an opportunity to explore fluidity: replacing buttons with tie closures and demonstrating the flattering and feminine possibilities of a cinched waist. A black satin sheath is made memorable by ribbon-like straps that cross at the back and are reprised to shape the wrap skirt. Even a trench of calfskin suede takes on an effortless quality when stripped of all extraneous details—collar, pockets, buttons—except for a velvety sash belt.

I like to create gestures. There is a lot of knotting and wrapping at Nehera, and I like when the wearer is someone that you have to decipher. Samuel Drira, creative director of Nehera

A clothing company that flourished in the 1930s, Nehera was relaunched in 2014 under the creative direction of Samuel Drira, who previously worked at Hugo Boss, The Row, and Hermès. “It’s classic, but the proportions and the way the pieces are put together is very unorthodox,” he says of the emerging Slovakian fashion label. Drira infuses experimental shapes with meticulous craftsmanship—and a hint of mystery. “Even if we use the most expensive fabrics, there is no screaming luxury.” Wraps and ties figure prominently into the latest Nehera collection, which includes an A-line skirt made sculptural by its wrapped waistline.

Proenza Schouler’s spring collection explores the idea of unraveling—of cutting loose and peeling away layers to find something pure. “We just wanted to show the power of craft and clothes-making,” notes Lazaro Hernandez, who with co-designer Jack McCollough used grosgrain ribbons as artful closures and alluring details. These functional embellishments made for especially interesting necklines, as in a high-contrast halter top in satin-back crepe.

Shop all fashion

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
From House to Home: The Enduring Ease of Tenfold

Why Knot: Tying It All Together for Spring

Why Knot:
Tying It All Together for Spring

Photographed by Hanna Tveite

No zip, snap, or button can match the elegance of even the most hastily tied bow. Whether in the form of a waist-cinching belt or a decorative knot, tied fastenings are appealing in their simplicity, evoking the grace of classical drapery and the ease of a bathrobe. The spring 2016 collections of Altuzarra, Protagonist, Nehera, and Proenza Schouler each embrace these elements in a distinctive way. Prepare to redefine the phrase “fit to be tied.”

In a serene spring collection inspired by the work of photographer Charles Fréger and his own Basque roots, designer Joseph Altuzarra celebrates “the beauty of materials which are close to nature,” he says. “Things which are not fussy.” Fabrics such as unbleached linen are accented by ties that are at once artful and easy, without sacrificing Altuzarra’s signature seductiveness. A wrap-style skirt is sharpened by contrast topstitching.

For Protagonist, this spring is an opportunity to explore fluidity: replacing buttons with tie closures and demonstrating the flattering and feminine possibilities of a cinched waist. A black satin sheath is made memorable by ribbon-like straps that cross at the back and are reprised to shape the wrap skirt. Even a trench of calfskin suede takes on an effortless quality when stripped of all extraneous details—collar, pockets, buttons—except for a velvety sash belt.

I like to create gestures. There is a lot of knotting and wrapping at Nehera, and I like when the wearer is someone that you have to decipher. Samuel Drira, creative director of Nehera

A clothing company that flourished in the 1930s, Nehera was relaunched in 2014 under the creative direction of Samuel Drira, who previously worked at Hugo Boss, The Row, and Hermès. “It’s classic, but the proportions and the way the pieces are put together is very unorthodox,” he says of the emerging Slovakian fashion label. Drira infuses experimental shapes with meticulous craftsmanship—and a hint of mystery. “Even if we use the most expensive fabrics, there is no screaming luxury.” Wraps and ties figure prominently into the latest Nehera collection, which includes an A-line skirt made sculptural by its wrapped waistline.

Proenza Schouler’s spring collection explores the idea of unraveling—of cutting loose and peeling away layers to find something pure. “We just wanted to show the power of craft and clothes-making,” notes Lazaro Hernandez, who with co-designer Jack McCollough used grosgrain ribbons as artful closures and alluring details. These functional embellishments made for especially interesting necklines, as in a high-contrast halter top in satin-back crepe.

Shop all fashion

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
From House to Home: The Enduring Ease of Tenfold