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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Wanderlust:
In Search of Enduring Denim

Photographed by Charlotte Wales

Despite its rugged composition and sturdy yet dimensional weave of colored warp with undyed weft, denim is the fabric most susceptible to the vagaries of fashion trends. Shapes, cuts, fits, washes, and even lengths can shift dramatically from one season to the next, making the perfect pair of jeans elusive—unless you know where to look. Seeking styles that reveal new creative possibilities yet don’t come with an expiration date? Walk this way...

Described by couturier Charles James as “America’s gift to the world,” denim has been elevated to an art form in Japan, where selvedge—construction that makes use of fabric’s outer, or self, edge—is a mark of authenticity and old-school weaving techniques, often on vintage looms. Quietly leading the country’s modern-day mastery of mid-century workwear is Chimala, named by founder Noriko Machida for a Himalayan mountain that exists only in her imagination. The company’s workshop in the Japanese countryside is a haven of nostalgia and meticulousness, from dyeing and weaving to sewing and distressing, that results in hand-finished jeans that look and fit like decades-old favorites.

Protagonist Tunic 07 Panel Tunic with Tie, Calvin Klein Collection Sleeveless Knit Tank with Asymmetrical Sides (coming soon), Acne Studios Katy Skirt, Tabitha Simmons Vera Sandals
One reason I love denim is that it’s very sustainable. It’s not a garment that you throw away every season.Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios

The seeds of Acne Studios were planted in 1997 with 100 pairs of jeans, distributed free to friends and family who were pressed into service as test subjects. “Five-pocket jeans are the Coca-Cola of fashion,” Acne creative director and co-founder Jonny Johansson has said of the Stockholm-based company’s decision to launch with denim. No fan of “fancy stuff,” he has since kept the collections largely free of “the stereotypes of fashion”—the trending styles that cycle in and out of sartorial favor—in favor of subtle modifications to fabric and silhouette that pay homage to Levi’s 501s.

Jeans are also at the core of 6397’s “wardrobe of essential pieces,” according to founder Stella Ishii. A denim connoisseur, she spent years sculpting her own perfect pairs with the help of the alterations department at G & G Cleaners in SoHo. “I’ve always liked jeans that are a little slouchier, kind of like how boys wear their jeans, so I’d find an existing pair, often vintage Levi’s, and then I’d tweak it,” she says. Each season, 6397 experiments with new fabrics and washes, with an eye not to planned obsolence but to filling out a wardrobe. “6397 is about finding those pieces that are missing in a collection,” says Ishii, “especially a designer collection.”

Loewe V-Neck Dress, Acne Studios Lita Jean in Clean Light Vintage

Styling Vanessa Traina
Hair Bok-Hee at Streeters
Makeup Daniel Martin at The Wall Group
Model Tami Williams

Shop all fashion

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Strike a Pose: The Power of Posture

Wanderlust: In Search of Enduring Denim

Wanderlust:
In Search of Enduring Denim

Photographed by Charlotte Wales

Despite its rugged composition and sturdy yet dimensional weave of colored warp with undyed weft, denim is the fabric most susceptible to the vagaries of fashion trends. Shapes, cuts, fits, washes, and even lengths can shift dramatically from one season to the next, making the perfect pair of jeans elusive—unless you know where to look. Seeking styles that reveal new creative possibilities yet don’t come with an expiration date? Walk this way...

Described by couturier Charles James as “America’s gift to the world,” denim has been elevated to an art form in Japan, where selvedge—construction that makes use of fabric’s outer, or self, edge—is a mark of authenticity and old-school weaving techniques, often on vintage looms. Quietly leading the country’s modern-day mastery of mid-century workwear is Chimala, named by founder Noriko Machida for a Himalayan mountain that exists only in her imagination. The company’s workshop in the Japanese countryside is a haven of nostalgia and meticulousness, from dyeing and weaving to sewing and distressing, that results in hand-finished jeans that look and fit like decades-old favorites.

Protagonist Tunic 07 Panel Tunic with Tie, Calvin Klein Collection Sleeveless Knit Tank with Asymmetrical Sides (coming soon), Acne Studios Katy Skirt, Tabitha Simmons Vera Sandals
One reason I love denim is that it’s very sustainable. It’s not a garment that you throw away every season.Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios

The seeds of Acne Studios were planted in 1997 with 100 pairs of jeans, distributed free to friends and family who were pressed into service as test subjects. “Five-pocket jeans are the Coca-Cola of fashion,” Acne creative director and co-founder Jonny Johansson has said of the Stockholm-based company’s decision to launch with denim. No fan of “fancy stuff,” he has since kept the collections largely free of “the stereotypes of fashion”—the trending styles that cycle in and out of sartorial favor—in favor of subtle modifications to fabric and silhouette that pay homage to Levi’s 501s.

Jeans are also at the core of 6397’s “wardrobe of essential pieces,” according to founder Stella Ishii. A denim connoisseur, she spent years sculpting her own perfect pairs with the help of the alterations department at G & G Cleaners in SoHo. “I’ve always liked jeans that are a little slouchier, kind of like how boys wear their jeans, so I’d find an existing pair, often vintage Levi’s, and then I’d tweak it,” she says. Each season, 6397 experiments with new fabrics and washes, with an eye not to planned obsolence but to filling out a wardrobe. “6397 is about finding those pieces that are missing in a collection,” says Ishii, “especially a designer collection.”

Loewe V-Neck Dress, Acne Studios Lita Jean in Clean Light Vintage

Styling Vanessa Traina
Hair Bok-Hee at Streeters
Makeup Daniel Martin at The Wall Group
Model Tami Williams

Shop all fashion

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Strike a Pose: The Power of Posture