The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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The Sky’s the Limit:
Jewelry by Sophie Bille Brahe

By Stephanie MurgPhotographed by Hanna Tveite

“I want to design jewelry that does not yet exist,” says Sophie Bille Brahe, pictured here at her company’s Copenhagen headquarters. “For me, it would be boring to make a classic diamond ring.” (Photo by Nikolaj Holm Møller)

“There’s nothing like the Scandinavian blueness—the blue sky, the blue sea—and I can see it in my pieces,” says jewelry designer Sophie Bille Brahe. Her Copenhagen atelier is grounded in the painstaking craft of goldsmithing, yet her collections float free of convention and frequently look to the heavens: earrings based upon elliptic orbits and constellations, suspensions of iridescent pearl moons, coiled rings that glimmer with discreet diamonds. An eye for stars runs in her family—she is the great-great-great-granddaughter of astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), and the owl-shaped fob on his pocket watch, a family heirloom, inspired one of her first pieces.

Bille Brahe’s famous ancestor was also an astrologer and alchemist, and there is an air of enchantment about her and her wearable creations. She fondly recalls childhood evening strolls with her father, a doctor, on which she was encouraged to say goodnight to all of the flora and fauna in their backyard garden. On Sundays, she and her brother were allowed to choose a drawer in the family’s “Chinese cabinet,” a fragile repository of trinkets accumulated over generations, and comb through its contents. “Once I found a precious diamond ring in the cabinet, and I got to keep it,” she says. “It made me understand the value of jewelry, and why people get so attached to beautiful objects.”

When I use gold or diamonds, my feeling is that you’re taking these precious materials out of the earth. You have a responsibility to do something special with them.Sophie Bille Brahe
“A pearl reminds me of the Moon, and this is the idea of an eclipse, with the Moon in its different phases,” says Bille Brahe. “It could have been really weird, but it’s elegant. Every woman I know who wears it looks good with an Elipse d’Or.” Two versions of the single earring are pictured here: the Elipse Grisatre and the Elipse Nuit.
Trained as a goldsmith, Bille Brahe feels a special connection to the metal. “There is something eternal about gold. It keeps its shape and color,” she says. “The possibilities when you work with gold are amazing and endless.” Her Pirouette Grand Ressort and Pirouette Elsa rings wrap around the finger, revealing petite diamonds at their sparkling tips.
What makes jewelry interesting is when it’s attached to a story or to a feeling that you get when you see it. The pieces I design have to have a story—some kind of history or poetry.Sophie Bille Brahe
Bille Brahe eschews the “bling-bling” effect in favor of pure forms and bold asymmetry. Her Petite Pirouette Spirale d’Or earring is available in versions designed to suit the right or left ear. “I like an easier approach to jewelry,” she says. “You collect what you want to wear and then put it together in your own way.”
“The whole idea with my pearl collection was to mix laid-back femininity with something a little bit more tough,” says Bille Brahe. Her Elipse Grisatre single earring connects a grey Tahitian pearl to a gleaming orb of 14-karat gold.

Bille Brahe’s path to making beautiful objects also began at a young age. Dyslexic, she gravitated to working with her hands, and soon set her sights on goldsmithing, determined to learn the craft before delving into design. “There is this whole beautiful tradition of training goldsmiths,” she says, finally summarizing her four-and-half-year education in three words: “measurement, measurement, measurement.” Rather than go on to complete an apprenticeship, she enrolled in a master’s program at London’s Royal College of Art. “It was the most amazing thing I’ve ever done,” says Bille Brahe. “It pushed me to believe in myself, to do things that I felt like doing, and to break all of the rules I had spent years learning.”

A fateful meeting with Julie Gilhart, then fashion director of Barneys, pushed Bille Brahe to start her own company. “Julie told me, ‘You have a talent. You have an obligation to do something with it,’” she explains of the meeting in Copenhagen that led her to begin assembling the funding and tight-knit “SBB” team. Since the collection debuted in 2011, Bille Brahe’s jewelry has been worn by the likes of Madonna and Uma Thurman, but her approach remains highly personal. “I make pieces that I want to wear myself,” she says with a shrug. “My dream is to make jewelry to keep. If a woman passes down a piece of mine to her daughter, then I’ll know I did my work well.”

Shop all jewelry

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
True Blue: The Eternally Indigo Denim Shirt

The Sky’s the Limit: Jewelry by Sophie Bille Brahe

The Sky’s the Limit:
Jewelry by Sophie Bille Brahe

By Stephanie MurgPhotographed by Hanna Tveite

“I want to design jewelry that does not yet exist,” says Sophie Bille Brahe, pictured here at her company’s Copenhagen headquarters. “For me, it would be boring to make a classic diamond ring.” (Photo by Nikolaj Holm Møller)

“There’s nothing like the Scandinavian blueness—the blue sky, the blue sea—and I can see it in my pieces,” says jewelry designer Sophie Bille Brahe. Her Copenhagen atelier is grounded in the painstaking craft of goldsmithing, yet her collections float free of convention and frequently look to the heavens: earrings based upon elliptic orbits and constellations, suspensions of iridescent pearl moons, coiled rings that glimmer with discreet diamonds. An eye for stars runs in her family—she is the great-great-great-granddaughter of astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), and the owl-shaped fob on his pocket watch, a family heirloom, inspired one of her first pieces.

Bille Brahe’s famous ancestor was also an astrologer and alchemist, and there is an air of enchantment about her and her wearable creations. She fondly recalls childhood evening strolls with her father, a doctor, on which she was encouraged to say goodnight to all of the flora and fauna in their backyard garden. On Sundays, she and her brother were allowed to choose a drawer in the family’s “Chinese cabinet,” a fragile repository of trinkets accumulated over generations, and comb through its contents. “Once I found a precious diamond ring in the cabinet, and I got to keep it,” she says. “It made me understand the value of jewelry, and why people get so attached to beautiful objects.”

When I use gold or diamonds, my feeling is that you’re taking these precious materials out of the earth. You have a responsibility to do something special with them.Sophie Bille Brahe
“A pearl reminds me of the Moon, and this is the idea of an eclipse, with the Moon in its different phases,” says Bille Brahe. “It could have been really weird, but it’s elegant. Every woman I know who wears it looks good with an Elipse d’Or.” Two versions of the single earring are pictured here: the Elipse Grisatre and the Elipse Nuit.
Trained as a goldsmith, Bille Brahe feels a special connection to the metal. “There is something eternal about gold. It keeps its shape and color,” she says. “The possibilities when you work with gold are amazing and endless.” Her Pirouette Grand Ressort and Pirouette Elsa rings wrap around the finger, revealing petite diamonds at their sparkling tips.
What makes jewelry interesting is when it’s attached to a story or to a feeling that you get when you see it. The pieces I design have to have a story—some kind of history or poetry.Sophie Bille Brahe
Bille Brahe eschews the “bling-bling” effect in favor of pure forms and bold asymmetry. Her Petite Pirouette Spirale d’Or earring is available in versions designed to suit the right or left ear. “I like an easier approach to jewelry,” she says. “You collect what you want to wear and then put it together in your own way.”
“The whole idea with my pearl collection was to mix laid-back femininity with something a little bit more tough,” says Bille Brahe. Her Elipse Grisatre single earring connects a grey Tahitian pearl to a gleaming orb of 14-karat gold.

Bille Brahe’s path to making beautiful objects also began at a young age. Dyslexic, she gravitated to working with her hands, and soon set her sights on goldsmithing, determined to learn the craft before delving into design. “There is this whole beautiful tradition of training goldsmiths,” she says, finally summarizing her four-and-half-year education in three words: “measurement, measurement, measurement.” Rather than go on to complete an apprenticeship, she enrolled in a master’s program at London’s Royal College of Art. “It was the most amazing thing I’ve ever done,” says Bille Brahe. “It pushed me to believe in myself, to do things that I felt like doing, and to break all of the rules I had spent years learning.”

A fateful meeting with Julie Gilhart, then fashion director of Barneys, pushed Bille Brahe to start her own company. “Julie told me, ‘You have a talent. You have an obligation to do something with it,’” she explains of the meeting in Copenhagen that led her to begin assembling the funding and tight-knit “SBB” team. Since the collection debuted in 2011, Bille Brahe’s jewelry has been worn by the likes of Madonna and Uma Thurman, but her approach remains highly personal. “I make pieces that I want to wear myself,” she says with a shrug. “My dream is to make jewelry to keep. If a woman passes down a piece of mine to her daughter, then I’ll know I did my work well.”

Shop all jewelry

Explore another chapter in The Stories:
True Blue: The Eternally Indigo Denim Shirt