The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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The Apartment:
The Quintessential Home

The quest to pare back and pull together is embodied not only in the fresh, sculptural silhouette of a pullover, a multi-tasking face oil, or a finely honed carafe but also through the spaces and lives that these refined goods enhance. What new meanings and functions do quintessential objects take on in an intimate domestic setting? How do storied objects relate to one another? What do they say about their owner? The answers are revealed in The Apartment by The Line.

The Apartment’s own story dates to 1872, when 76 Greene Street was just an eye-poppingly intricate sketch on the drawing board of Isaac F. Duckworth. A master of cast-iron architecture, he looked to the eclectic baroque of the Second Empire to design a “commercial palace” worthy of the flourishing dry goods company owned by Gardner Colby (whose name lives on in the Maine college he endowed). The building changed hands many times as the New York neighborhood of SoHo grew and transformed around it.

In the living room, the natural canvas upholstery of the PK 22 Lounge Chair by Poul Kjærholm for Fritz Hansen is accented by the natural tones of a changing selection of textiles, including a vintage Moroccan Beni Ourain rug. Among the accessories on the table are a tilted glass bowl designed by Anna Torfs, a rock crystal bowl, a kudu horn, and Le Labo’s grandest of candles: scented wax poured into a concrete vessel.
Inspired in part by a Milo Baughman design, the custom Las Venus sofa makes diamond tufting feel modern with the choice of deep navy velvet and sleek chrome legs. A lacquered tray corrals useful objects such as tealight holders and a magnifying glass on one of the coffee tables, while the other holds Noma by René Redzepi.

Nearly 150 years after the building first opened for business, its third floor has been reborn as the light-filled home of a discerning woman who appreciates a finely tailored jacket as much as a bespoke velvet sofa. The airy yet cozy living room, bounded on one side by an original Corinthian column and on another by a wall of large windows, is a considered collection of textures, forms, and eras. One area is designed for conversation, while a sculptural window seat offers a contemplative perch overlooking the ever-changing city.

The selection of home accessories at The Apartment mixes natural forms and materials such as petrified wood with clean lines and precise geometry. The granite bowl is a domestically scaled version of the monumental marble vessel designed in 1963 by Poul Kjærholm for the town hall of Fredericia, Denmark.

In the dining room, a custom marble table is a horizontal counterpoint to the loft’s high ceilings. The smooth, unsealed stone tabletop also draws the eye to the curiosities and photographs that line one side of the space. Illuminating the space are five hand-blown glass chandeliers designed by Jan Plechác and Henry Wielgus for Lasvit. Their “Neverending Glory” collection is inspired by chandeliers from five of the world’s major opera houses: the Metropolitan Opera, the Palais Garnier, La Scala, the Estates Theatre in Prague, and the Bolshoi Theatre.

A shelf that lines one wall of The Apartment is an ideal place for displaying curiosities and treasures, such as a porcelain pear from Penkridge Ceramics.
Architect Made Turning Tray 1, Architect Made Turning Tray 2, Architect Made Turning Tray 3, KPM Berlin Urania Egg Cup, KPM Berlin Urania Gravy Boat, Creel and Gow Silvered Banana
A console table inspired by the work of Paul McCobb displays several objects from Hadassa, one of the oldest and largest antique dealers in the United States. The Art Deco-style lamp, one of a pair, mounts a block of snowflake obsidian atop silvered wood. Also pictured: Hadassa Glass Cloches, Creel and Gow Large Kudu Horn, Creel and Gow Amethyst Bowl

The lacquered box of a walk-in closet is part inner sanctum, part loft divider. The intimately scaled interior, filled with pieces by the likes of Reed Krakoff, Christophe Lemaire, and Protagonist, gains warmth through a mix of exotic textures and personal touches, from a Moroccan rug and a tufted leather bench to a nook of favorite fragrances and antique metal boxes that date to Japan’s Meiji period.

Visitors are beckoned to the library and beyond by an eclectic range of vintage and new books. The evolving collection of reading material, including a selection of stunning volumes by Assouline, Phaidon, and Taschen, is bracketed by streamlined furniture that creates an interplay of horizontal and vertical lines along with metal, glass, lacquer, and leather surfaces.

The Apartment's library includes books from Assouline, Phaidon, and Taschen as well as periodicals such as The Travel Almanac and The Last Magazine.
A niche inside the walk-in closet keeps daily essentials at hand and inspiring books, such as Reed Krakoff’s Women in Art: Figures of Influence, in sight. Also pictured: Cleanser 27, Essence 27, and Baume 27, all by M.E. SkinLab

Afforded a measure of privacy by the walk-in closet, the bedroom takes full advantage of The Apartment’s eastern exposure. Morning light streams through the large windows to illuminate the most personal space of the home, furnished with timeless, versatile pieces that favor bold forms and materials that celebrate rather than conceal their histories.

The Apartment by The Line is open
Tuesday–Saturday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Sunday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
or by appointment

Location:
76 Greene Street
3rd Floor
New York City, NY 10012


The Flag Halyard Chair, designed in 1950 by Hans Wegner, provides an ideal perch for reading. The obscured portraits over the platform bed are works from Max Snow’s “100 Headless Women” series. Also pictured: The Warehouse Pair of Side Tables, linen bedding from Golden, Armand Diradourian Jersey Stripe Knit Throw, Morihata Chikuno Cube House

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The Quintessential Home: Inside The Apartment

The Apartment:
The Quintessential Home

The quest to pare back and pull together is embodied not only in the fresh, sculptural silhouette of a pullover, a multi-tasking face oil, or a finely honed carafe but also through the spaces and lives that these refined goods enhance. What new meanings and functions do quintessential objects take on in an intimate domestic setting? How do storied objects relate to one another? What do they say about their owner? The answers are revealed in The Apartment by The Line.

The Apartment’s own story dates to 1872, when 76 Greene Street was just an eye-poppingly intricate sketch on the drawing board of Isaac F. Duckworth. A master of cast-iron architecture, he looked to the eclectic baroque of the Second Empire to design a “commercial palace” worthy of the flourishing dry goods company owned by Gardner Colby (whose name lives on in the Maine college he endowed). The building changed hands many times as the New York neighborhood of SoHo grew and transformed around it.

In the living room, the natural canvas upholstery of the PK 22 Lounge Chair by Poul Kjærholm for Fritz Hansen is accented by the natural tones of a changing selection of textiles, including a vintage Moroccan Beni Ourain rug. Among the accessories on the table are a tilted glass bowl designed by Anna Torfs, a rock crystal bowl, a kudu horn, and Le Labo’s grandest of candles: scented wax poured into a concrete vessel.
Inspired in part by a Milo Baughman design, the custom Las Venus sofa makes diamond tufting feel modern with the choice of deep navy velvet and sleek chrome legs. A lacquered tray corrals useful objects such as tealight holders and a magnifying glass on one of the coffee tables, while the other holds Noma by René Redzepi.

Nearly 150 years after the building first opened for business, its third floor has been reborn as the light-filled home of a discerning woman who appreciates a finely tailored jacket as much as a bespoke velvet sofa. The airy yet cozy living room, bounded on one side by an original Corinthian column and on another by a wall of large windows, is a considered collection of textures, forms, and eras. One area is designed for conversation, while a sculptural window seat offers a contemplative perch overlooking the ever-changing city.

The selection of home accessories at The Apartment mixes natural forms and materials such as petrified wood with clean lines and precise geometry. The granite bowl is a domestically scaled version of the monumental marble vessel designed in 1963 by Poul Kjærholm for the town hall of Fredericia, Denmark.

In the dining room, a custom marble table is a horizontal counterpoint to the loft’s high ceilings. The smooth, unsealed stone tabletop also draws the eye to the curiosities and photographs that line one side of the space. Illuminating the space are five hand-blown glass chandeliers designed by Jan Plechác and Henry Wielgus for Lasvit. Their “Neverending Glory” collection is inspired by chandeliers from five of the world’s major opera houses: the Metropolitan Opera, the Palais Garnier, La Scala, the Estates Theatre in Prague, and the Bolshoi Theatre.

A shelf that lines one wall of The Apartment is an ideal place for displaying curiosities and treasures, such as a porcelain pear from Penkridge Ceramics.
Architect Made Turning Tray 1, Architect Made Turning Tray 2, Architect Made Turning Tray 3, KPM Berlin Urania Egg Cup, KPM Berlin Urania Gravy Boat, Creel and Gow Silvered Banana
A console table inspired by the work of Paul McCobb displays several objects from Hadassa, one of the oldest and largest antique dealers in the United States. The Art Deco-style lamp, one of a pair, mounts a block of snowflake obsidian atop silvered wood. Also pictured: Hadassa Glass Cloches, Creel and Gow Large Kudu Horn, Creel and Gow Amethyst Bowl

The lacquered box of a walk-in closet is part inner sanctum, part loft divider. The intimately scaled interior, filled with pieces by the likes of Reed Krakoff, Christophe Lemaire, and Protagonist, gains warmth through a mix of exotic textures and personal touches, from a Moroccan rug and a tufted leather bench to a nook of favorite fragrances and antique metal boxes that date to Japan’s Meiji period.

Visitors are beckoned to the library and beyond by an eclectic range of vintage and new books. The evolving collection of reading material, including a selection of stunning volumes by Assouline, Phaidon, and Taschen, is bracketed by streamlined furniture that creates an interplay of horizontal and vertical lines along with metal, glass, lacquer, and leather surfaces.

The Apartment's library includes books from Assouline, Phaidon, and Taschen as well as periodicals such as The Travel Almanac and The Last Magazine.
A niche inside the walk-in closet keeps daily essentials at hand and inspiring books, such as Reed Krakoff’s Women in Art: Figures of Influence, in sight. Also pictured: Cleanser 27, Essence 27, and Baume 27, all by M.E. SkinLab

Afforded a measure of privacy by the walk-in closet, the bedroom takes full advantage of The Apartment’s eastern exposure. Morning light streams through the large windows to illuminate the most personal space of the home, furnished with timeless, versatile pieces that favor bold forms and materials that celebrate rather than conceal their histories.

The Apartment by The Line is open
Tuesday–Saturday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Sunday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
or by appointment

Location:
76 Greene Street
3rd Floor
New York City, NY 10012


The Flag Halyard Chair, designed in 1950 by Hans Wegner, provides an ideal perch for reading. The obscured portraits over the platform bed are works from Max Snow’s “100 Headless Women” series. Also pictured: The Warehouse Pair of Side Tables, linen bedding from Golden, Armand Diradourian Jersey Stripe Knit Throw, Morihata Chikuno Cube House

Get Our Weekly Chapters In Your Inbox

Sign up for news and updates from The Line.