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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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The Art of the Hamptons:
Five Inspirational Destinations

Photographed by Robin Stein and Hanna Tveite

Ever since the likes of Winslow Homer and Childe Hassam set up their easels on the beaches and village lanes of East Hampton, Long Island’s East End—home to The Line – Amagansett—has beckoned artists with its luminosity and tranquility. That creative legacy lives on in some of the region’s most inspirational places, from the meticulously preserved home and studio of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner (above) to the Herzog & de Meuron-designed Parrish Art Museum.

In the small barn that Jackson Pollock used as a studio, the floor is marked with lively traces of Autumn Rhythm, Convergence, Blue Poles, and many more of the works he painted between 1946 and 1952, after which the building was winterized.

Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

In 1945, Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner moved from New York City to East Hampton’s Springs, where a loan from art dealer Peggy Guggenheim allowed them to buy a small home overlooking Accabonac Creek. Pollock soon repurposed the backyard barn as a workspace, where he tacked canvases to the floor and began creating densely layered all-over compositions, while Krasner made her studio in the house’s back parlor. These and other elements of the couple’s lives are preserved at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center.

Created under the terms of Krasner’s will and envisioned as “a public museum and library,” the intimate spaces show the setting in which Pollock and Krasner created many of their works and often play host to special exhibitions. Visitors can don protective booties and prowl the paint-spattered barn studio floors, examine original tools and materials, or inspect Pollock’s collection of jazz records and volumes from Krasner’s library.

The house contains all of the furnishings and artifacts present at the time of Krasner’s death in 1984, including a 1979 portrait by Fred McDarrah. “I would like to be able to keep it pulsing through at all times,” said Krasner in one of her last interviews. “I like a canvas to breathe and be alive.”
Krasner began to use the barn studio in 1956, after Pollock’s death, and worked there for the rest of her life. The walls preserve the ghosts of her canvases and vibrant palette.
An outpost of the Dia Art Foundation, the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton holds a permanent installation of nine works in fluorescent light created by the artist between 1963 and 1981, and a gallery for changing exhibitions.
One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.Dan Flavin

The Dan Flavin Art Institute

When asked in 1982 if he aspired to achieve permanence for his work, Dan Flavin responded with characteristically ornery charm. “It’s electric current with a switch—dubious,” said the artist, who was already working with the Dia Art Foundation on the installation that would open the following year in Bridgehampton as the Dan Flavin Art Institute.

Located in a firehouse-turned-church that was renovated under Flavin’s direction to evoke both former uses, the East End outpost of Dia holds a permanent installation of nine works in fluorescent light created by the artist between 1963 and 1981 as well as a gallery for changing exhibitions. On view through April 30th of 2017 is Dan Flavin: icons, which presents a series of eight early works that bridge painting and sculpture.

The permanent installation of the Dan Flavin Art Institute includes this untitled work from 1976, an eight-foot-long pink, blue, and green fluorescent light that nestles in a corner of the renovated firehouse’s second floor.
Based on Buckminster Fuller’s all-seeing original, the Fly’s Eye Dome at LongHouse Reserve was developed and produced by John Kuthik in 1998. Sol LeWitt’s Irregular Progression, High #7 (2006) is a favorite of young visitors, who like to climb on its concrete blocks.

LongHouse Reserve

Textile designer, author, and collector Jack Lenor Larsen describes the Shinto shrine in the Japanese city of Ise as “the most beautiful building in the world.” The seventh-century wooden structure was the inspiration for LongHouse, the 13,000-square-foot structure on the sprawling East Hampton property that Larsen acquired in 1975 and soon began transforming into “a case study to share with others,” complete with “a demonstration house, on alternate lifestyle.”

Today the 16-acre reserve is open to the public, with a collection of more than 60 contemporary sculptures—by the likes of Willem de Kooning, Sol Lewitt, and Yoko Ono—placed throughout the lushly landscaped grounds. “Originally I thought that the public part of it would be after my lifetime or after I moved out of the house,” notes Larsen, who turns 89 this year. “But that’s certainly not the case.”

With a form resembling that of a thatched hut, the African House was built for the Watermill Center’s 2013 Summer Benefit, which honored the life and work of Clementine Hunter (1886-1988). “She was the first artist I ever met in my life,” Watermill founder Robert Wilson has said. “When I was twelve years old, I went to Natchitoches, Louisiana. It was summer vacation with my family. We visited a plantation, Melrose. And I met an Afro-American woman who was a painter. I already had some idea of what I wanted to do in life, and one of the things that interested me was painting.”
In May, the Trisha Brown Dance Company returned to the Watermill Center to perform a site-specific dance piece freed from the constrictions of the stage.

The Watermill Center

Founded by theater and visual artist Robert Wilson, the Watermill Center is “a laboratory for performance,” fostering research in the arts of the stage. The eight-and-a-half acre campus, a former Western Union research facility in Water Mill, opened to the public in July 2006, and among the tenth anniversary programs is a series of performances inviting past resident artists to return and present works that are intimately linked to the center. On July 30th, the grounds will come alive with installations and performances for the annual Watermill Center Summer Benefit, which this year includes a special collaboration with the Brooklyn-based artist collective known as the Bruce High Quality Foundation.

Parrish Art Museum

Invigorated by the 2012 opening of its Herzog & de Meuron-designed home in Water Mill, the Parrish Art Museum is dedicated to American art, especially that of the East End. A pair of Roy Lichtenstein’s monumental brushstroke sculptures mark the museum’s Montauk Highway entrance, and the permanent collection includes extensive holdings of the work of William Merritt Chase and Fairfield Porter. Locals Ross Bleckner, Eric Fischl, and David Salle are the focus of an upcoming exhibition, Unfinished Business. Opening August 7th, the show outlines the development of each painter’s formal vocabulary while suggesting deep connections between and among the works of all three.

Designed by Herzog & de Meuron and completed in 2012, the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill is a double-barrelled, elongated version of the classic house-shaped artist’s studio, with north-facing skylights.

The Art of the Hamptons: Five Inspirational Destinations

The Art of the Hamptons:
Five Inspirational Destinations

Photographed by Robin Stein and Hanna Tveite

Ever since the likes of Winslow Homer and Childe Hassam set up their easels on the beaches and village lanes of East Hampton, Long Island’s East End—home to The Line – Amagansett—has beckoned artists with its luminosity and tranquility. That creative legacy lives on in some of the region’s most inspirational places, from the meticulously preserved home and studio of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner (above) to the Herzog & de Meuron-designed Parrish Art Museum.

In the small barn that Jackson Pollock used as a studio, the floor is marked with lively traces of Autumn Rhythm, Convergence, Blue Poles, and many more of the works he painted between 1946 and 1952, after which the building was winterized.

Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

In 1945, Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner moved from New York City to East Hampton’s Springs, where a loan from art dealer Peggy Guggenheim allowed them to buy a small home overlooking Accabonac Creek. Pollock soon repurposed the backyard barn as a workspace, where he tacked canvases to the floor and began creating densely layered all-over compositions, while Krasner made her studio in the house’s back parlor. These and other elements of the couple’s lives are preserved at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center.

Created under the terms of Krasner’s will and envisioned as “a public museum and library,” the intimate spaces show the setting in which Pollock and Krasner created many of their works and often play host to special exhibitions. Visitors can don protective booties and prowl the paint-spattered barn studio floors, examine original tools and materials, or inspect Pollock’s collection of jazz records and volumes from Krasner’s library.

The house contains all of the furnishings and artifacts present at the time of Krasner’s death in 1984, including a 1979 portrait by Fred McDarrah. “I would like to be able to keep it pulsing through at all times,” said Krasner in one of her last interviews. “I like a canvas to breathe and be alive.”
Krasner began to use the barn studio in 1956, after Pollock’s death, and worked there for the rest of her life. The walls preserve the ghosts of her canvases and vibrant palette.
An outpost of the Dia Art Foundation, the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton holds a permanent installation of nine works in fluorescent light created by the artist between 1963 and 1981, and a gallery for changing exhibitions.
One might not think of light as a matter of fact, but I do. And it is as plain and open and direct an art as you will ever find.Dan Flavin

The Dan Flavin Art Institute

When asked in 1982 if he aspired to achieve permanence for his work, Dan Flavin responded with characteristically ornery charm. “It’s electric current with a switch—dubious,” said the artist, who was already working with the Dia Art Foundation on the installation that would open the following year in Bridgehampton as the Dan Flavin Art Institute.

Located in a firehouse-turned-church that was renovated under Flavin’s direction to evoke both former uses, the East End outpost of Dia holds a permanent installation of nine works in fluorescent light created by the artist between 1963 and 1981 as well as a gallery for changing exhibitions. On view through April 30th of 2017 is Dan Flavin: icons, which presents a series of eight early works that bridge painting and sculpture.

The permanent installation of the Dan Flavin Art Institute includes this untitled work from 1976, an eight-foot-long pink, blue, and green fluorescent light that nestles in a corner of the renovated firehouse’s second floor.
Based on Buckminster Fuller’s all-seeing original, the Fly’s Eye Dome at LongHouse Reserve was developed and produced by John Kuthik in 1998. Sol LeWitt’s Irregular Progression, High #7 (2006) is a favorite of young visitors, who like to climb on its concrete blocks.

LongHouse Reserve

Textile designer, author, and collector Jack Lenor Larsen describes the Shinto shrine in the Japanese city of Ise as “the most beautiful building in the world.” The seventh-century wooden structure was the inspiration for LongHouse, the 13,000-square-foot structure on the sprawling East Hampton property that Larsen acquired in 1975 and soon began transforming into “a case study to share with others,” complete with “a demonstration house, on alternate lifestyle.”

Today the 16-acre reserve is open to the public, with a collection of more than 60 contemporary sculptures—by the likes of Willem de Kooning, Sol Lewitt, and Yoko Ono—placed throughout the lushly landscaped grounds. “Originally I thought that the public part of it would be after my lifetime or after I moved out of the house,” notes Larsen, who turns 89 this year. “But that’s certainly not the case.”

With a form resembling that of a thatched hut, the African House was built for the Watermill Center’s 2013 Summer Benefit, which honored the life and work of Clementine Hunter (1886-1988). “She was the first artist I ever met in my life,” Watermill founder Robert Wilson has said. “When I was twelve years old, I went to Natchitoches, Louisiana. It was summer vacation with my family. We visited a plantation, Melrose. And I met an Afro-American woman who was a painter. I already had some idea of what I wanted to do in life, and one of the things that interested me was painting.”
In May, the Trisha Brown Dance Company returned to the Watermill Center to perform a site-specific dance piece freed from the constrictions of the stage.

The Watermill Center

Founded by theater and visual artist Robert Wilson, the Watermill Center is “a laboratory for performance,” fostering research in the arts of the stage. The eight-and-a-half acre campus, a former Western Union research facility in Water Mill, opened to the public in July 2006, and among the tenth anniversary programs is a series of performances inviting past resident artists to return and present works that are intimately linked to the center. On July 30th, the grounds will come alive with installations and performances for the annual Watermill Center Summer Benefit, which this year includes a special collaboration with the Brooklyn-based artist collective known as the Bruce High Quality Foundation.

Parrish Art Museum

Invigorated by the 2012 opening of its Herzog & de Meuron-designed home in Water Mill, the Parrish Art Museum is dedicated to American art, especially that of the East End. A pair of Roy Lichtenstein’s monumental brushstroke sculptures mark the museum’s Montauk Highway entrance, and the permanent collection includes extensive holdings of the work of William Merritt Chase and Fairfield Porter. Locals Ross Bleckner, Eric Fischl, and David Salle are the focus of an upcoming exhibition, Unfinished Business. Opening August 7th, the show outlines the development of each painter’s formal vocabulary while suggesting deep connections between and among the works of all three.

Designed by Herzog & de Meuron and completed in 2012, the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill is a double-barrelled, elongated version of the classic house-shaped artist’s studio, with north-facing skylights.