The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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The Apartment, Reinvented:
At Home in Los Angeles

Written by Marc Palatucci
Photographed by Hanna Tveite and Thomas Slack

A new chapter of The Apartment is here. Nestled on tree-lined Melrose Place in the heart of West Hollywood, the second offline home of The Line welcomes a new city of visitors into the uniquely immersive experience born two years ago in New York’s SoHo, as freshly combined elements of residence, showroom, and boutique create a natural habitat for refined goods. In Los Angeles, these notions of context deepen, extending beyond the walls of the space to encompass the surrounding neighborhood and city. As a result, The Apartment by The Line – Los Angeles is a serene space distinguished by multi-layered modern design and relaxed West Coast charm.

Among the vintage pieces at The Apartment are a table and chairs by Alvar Aalto (1898-1976), whose furniture design sowed the seeds from which many of his architectural ideas sprang forth.
Overlooking Melrose Place, a window perch also does the job of a coffee table, displaying objects such as a handcrafted white oak board from Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co., Noma by René Redzepi, Phaidon’s Eating with the Chefs, and a trio of mirror-polished stainless steel pieces from Georg Jensen: the HK Pitcher, Ilse Vase, and Helena Milk Jug. Linen pillows from Libeco make the nook even more inviting.

In contrast to New York’s towering, modular cityscape, Los Angeles splays out laterally. It is a vast, low metropolis suffused with light and air. The site of The Apartment reflects the city’s expansive inclinations, occupying the second and topmost floor of a corner building in the center of Melrose Place, with its row of shops and cafes offering a measure of seclusion from the neighborhood’s more heavily trafficked areas.

A seating area supplements The Apartment’s natural light with vintage sconces in the style of Jean Royère that flank photographs by Aaron Siskind, Ray Metzker, Candida Höfer, and Edward Weston. Softened by a sheepskin throw and linen pillows, the rare George Nelson sofa with custom bronze legs is joined by a pair of Fritz Hansen PK22 Lounge Chairs, travertine and wrought iron side tables by Salterini, and a vintage Morgan coffee table.
“I see the body as a residence to our emotions, our soul, our inner selves,” says Los Angeles-based artist Mona Kuhn, whose Flower (2005) is among the works of art in The Apartment.
Illuminated by a pair of custom multi-cone chandeliers from Los Angeles-based Rewire, the angular dining table is paired with chairs in the style of Charlotte Perriand.
A trio of brass and silk cord pendants by Swedish designer Hans-Agne Jakobsson (1919-2009) light the way to the walk-in closet, where custom-made benches from Doug McCollough’s Lino series combine solid hardwood legs and stretchers with birch plywood and linoleum.
I wasn’t captivated by the romance of Paris or London. I love visiting, but I’d rather be in L.A. Ed Ruscha

The Apartment is spread out over two adjoining spaces, separated by an open-air walkway of Moroccan tile in a hushed palette of sun-baked greys, tan, white, and pale pink. Soothing hues continue throughout The Apartment, with a natural spectrum of white, cream, beige, gold, and black enlivened by the blue and red detailing of beautifully worn Oriental rugs, the dusty shades of desert plants, and the colorful bindings of new and vintage books. The front room is free of walled partitions, with each area gently giving way to the next in full view of one another. At the entrance, a modern banquet table and extended kitchen countertop anchor the room, while the near corner, casually demarcated by two sets of shelves, is home to an informal library. Toward the far end, with windows looking out over the storefronts below and the rooftops beyond, two airy lounge areas are furnished with a selection of homegoods, artworks, and lighting.

The rear quarters offer a more intimate setting, with the various areas encircling a central island of private fitting rooms. Past the wood-paneled recessed racks of clothing, a marble-topped vanity invites hands-on exploration of bath, body, and fragrance offerings. Nestled toward the back, beyond a freestanding bowl-shaped tub, is the bedroom area, featuring a custom wooden bed from Doug McCullough’s DM/DM studio, whose linoleum-accented benches also dot the apartment. Soft light emanates from custom sconces by Atelier de Troupe and pieces from nearby vintage lighting specialists Rewire, complemented by natural light pouring in through a series of windows and skylights. Encircling the two main spaces, a wraparound balcony adorned with an array of succulents and other local flora beckons guests to step into the sunshine and admire the distant Hollywood Hills and the palm-limned city vista.

Illuminated by Atelier de Troupe’s twisting metal sconces, dressing areas are furnished with vintage rugs and patinated brass hooks crafted in the fourth-generation Viennese workshop of Carl Auböck.
Making their debut on The Line via the Los Angeles Apartment are Birkenstocks customized with alligator leather straps by Houston-based Alexandra Knight, a specialist in exotic skins. The giant walnut and brass clothespin is from Odd Era.
A hand-blown Lasvit chandelier inspired by that of Prague’s Estates Theatre hangs over the serene soaking tub, which is attended by a tiered mid-century side table that keeps Susanne Kaufmann bath products close at hand.
I think L.A. represents an opportunity to understand what democracy creates and to work with it. That’s what Jasper [Johns] and [Robert] Rauschenberg did—pick up the detritus of the city and use it in their art. Frank Gehry
Beside a Pastoe Cube Chair designed in 1980 by Radboud van Beekum, a speckle-glazed ewer from Odd Era sits on a Dunbar three-legged table that dates from the 1960s. Bring a similar look to the tabletop with a leather-lined brass tray by Copenhagen-based GamFratesi for Skultuna.
Bookended by a large sphere of pink marble, vintage tomes sit alongside a limited-edition, five-volume boxed set of Galerie Patrick Seguin’s volumes on Jean Prouvé.
Artfully arranged on a bookshelf that also acts as a porous room divider, photography books, vessels, and a kudu horn are joined by the chalice-like form of an incense burner and tealight holder from Brooklyn-based Apparatus along with a streamlined incense burner from Cinnamon Projects.

From the L.A. Library: Five Essential Volumes

1

City of Quartz by Mike Davis (Verso)
Penetrate “Fortress L.A.” in this unparalleled reconstruction of the city’s shadow history and dissection of its ethereal economy.

2

Wallpaper* City Guide Los Angeles (Phaidon)
Tightly edited and discreetly packaged, this photo-laden paperback is a passport to the best of L.A.

3

I’m Losing You by Bruce Wagner (Plume)
Dial into Wagner’s intoxicating “cell phone trilogy” with this luminous, savage novel of the dystopia known as Hollywood.

4

They Called Her Styrene by Ed Ruscha (Phaidon)
The artist has the final word(s) on L.A. and much more in this thick block of a book that is an art object in itself.

5

Eames by Gloria Koenig (Taschen)
An illustrated primer on the the husband-and-wife team that transformed the visual character of America. A must read before making a pilgrimage to their iconic house in Pacific Palisades.

Among the quintessential goods on offer are new additions that embody the native ethos and aesthetic, including the timeless bags of local designer Agnes Baddoo and delicate jewelry from Kathleen Whitaker. NewbarK’s versatile loafers and chic sandals are a natural fit for the temperate climes of southern California, and the local brand has crafted a new shearling slide that is exclusive to The Line. In addition, hand-thrown ceramics from the Echo Park studio of California native Victoria Morris are placed throughout The Apartment.

A tremendous amount of thought, care, and inspiration have made the L.A. Apartment a space unlike any other: a place to connect, commune, and ground oneself in a sprawling city. In the weeks and months ahead, The Apartment will play host to a diverse series of events, from dinners and cocktail hours, to visits from featured designers, artists and artisans, making the most of the many facets of this fully functional living space.

Dressed in Tenfold washed linen sheeting and topped with a cashmere throw and accent pillows, Doug McCollough’s linoleum-paneled, birch-frame platform bed with attached side tables is the centerpiece of the bedroom, which is illuminated by a Parentesi light by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzu for FLOS and a bedside Grashoppa lamp by Greta Grossman. The black rattan rocking chair beneath a cozy sheepskin throw is a 1969 design by Nanna Ditzel and the works over the bed are by Hungarian designer György Kepes.

The Apartment, Reinvented: At Home in Los Angeles

The Apartment, Reinvented:
At Home in Los Angeles

Written by Marc Palatucci
Photographed by Hanna Tveite and Thomas Slack

A new chapter of The Apartment is here. Nestled on tree-lined Melrose Place in the heart of West Hollywood, the second offline home of The Line welcomes a new city of visitors into the uniquely immersive experience born two years ago in New York’s SoHo, as freshly combined elements of residence, showroom, and boutique create a natural habitat for refined goods. In Los Angeles, these notions of context deepen, extending beyond the walls of the space to encompass the surrounding neighborhood and city. As a result, The Apartment by The Line – Los Angeles is a serene space distinguished by multi-layered modern design and relaxed West Coast charm.

Among the vintage pieces at The Apartment are a table and chairs by Alvar Aalto (1898-1976), whose furniture design sowed the seeds from which many of his architectural ideas sprang forth.
Overlooking Melrose Place, a window perch also does the job of a coffee table, displaying objects such as a handcrafted white oak board from Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co., Noma by René Redzepi, Phaidon’s Eating with the Chefs, and a trio of mirror-polished stainless steel pieces from Georg Jensen: the HK Pitcher, Ilse Vase, and Helena Milk Jug. Linen pillows from Libeco make the nook even more inviting.

In contrast to New York’s towering, modular cityscape, Los Angeles splays out laterally. It is a vast, low metropolis suffused with light and air. The site of The Apartment reflects the city’s expansive inclinations, occupying the second and topmost floor of a corner building in the center of Melrose Place, with its row of shops and cafes offering a measure of seclusion from the neighborhood’s more heavily trafficked areas.

A seating area supplements The Apartment’s natural light with vintage sconces in the style of Jean Royère that flank photographs by Aaron Siskind, Ray Metzker, Candida Höfer, and Edward Weston. Softened by a sheepskin throw and linen pillows, the rare George Nelson sofa with custom bronze legs is joined by a pair of Fritz Hansen PK22 Lounge Chairs, travertine and wrought iron side tables by Salterini, and a vintage Morgan coffee table.
“I see the body as a residence to our emotions, our soul, our inner selves,” says Los Angeles-based artist Mona Kuhn, whose Flower (2005) is among the works of art in The Apartment.
Illuminated by a pair of custom multi-cone chandeliers from Los Angeles-based Rewire, the angular dining table is paired with chairs in the style of Charlotte Perriand.
A trio of brass and silk cord pendants by Swedish designer Hans-Agne Jakobsson (1919-2009) light the way to the walk-in closet, where custom-made benches from Doug McCollough’s Lino series combine solid hardwood legs and stretchers with birch plywood and linoleum.
I wasn’t captivated by the romance of Paris or London. I love visiting, but I’d rather be in L.A. Ed Ruscha

The Apartment is spread out over two adjoining spaces, separated by an open-air walkway of Moroccan tile in a hushed palette of sun-baked greys, tan, white, and pale pink. Soothing hues continue throughout The Apartment, with a natural spectrum of white, cream, beige, gold, and black enlivened by the blue and red detailing of beautifully worn Oriental rugs, the dusty shades of desert plants, and the colorful bindings of new and vintage books. The front room is free of walled partitions, with each area gently giving way to the next in full view of one another. At the entrance, a modern banquet table and extended kitchen countertop anchor the room, while the near corner, casually demarcated by two sets of shelves, is home to an informal library. Toward the far end, with windows looking out over the storefronts below and the rooftops beyond, two airy lounge areas are furnished with a selection of homegoods, artworks, and lighting.

The rear quarters offer a more intimate setting, with the various areas encircling a central island of private fitting rooms. Past the wood-paneled recessed racks of clothing, a marble-topped vanity invites hands-on exploration of bath, body, and fragrance offerings. Nestled toward the back, beyond a freestanding bowl-shaped tub, is the bedroom area, featuring a custom wooden bed from Doug McCullough’s DM/DM studio, whose linoleum-accented benches also dot the apartment. Soft light emanates from custom sconces by Atelier de Troupe and pieces from nearby vintage lighting specialists Rewire, complemented by natural light pouring in through a series of windows and skylights. Encircling the two main spaces, a wraparound balcony adorned with an array of succulents and other local flora beckons guests to step into the sunshine and admire the distant Hollywood Hills and the palm-limned city vista.

Illuminated by Atelier de Troupe’s twisting metal sconces, dressing areas are furnished with vintage rugs and patinated brass hooks crafted in the fourth-generation Viennese workshop of Carl Auböck.
Making their debut on The Line via the Los Angeles Apartment are Birkenstocks customized with alligator leather straps by Houston-based Alexandra Knight, a specialist in exotic skins. The giant walnut and brass clothespin is from Odd Era.
A hand-blown Lasvit chandelier inspired by that of Prague’s Estates Theatre hangs over the serene soaking tub, which is attended by a tiered mid-century side table that keeps Susanne Kaufmann bath products close at hand.
I think L.A. represents an opportunity to understand what democracy creates and to work with it. That’s what Jasper [Johns] and [Robert] Rauschenberg did—pick up the detritus of the city and use it in their art. Frank Gehry
Beside a Pastoe Cube Chair designed in 1980 by Radboud van Beekum, a speckle-glazed ewer from Odd Era sits on a Dunbar three-legged table that dates from the 1960s. Bring a similar look to the tabletop with a leather-lined brass tray by Copenhagen-based GamFratesi for Skultuna.
Bookended by a large sphere of pink marble, vintage tomes sit alongside a limited-edition, five-volume boxed set of Galerie Patrick Seguin’s volumes on Jean Prouvé.
Artfully arranged on a bookshelf that also acts as a porous room divider, photography books, vessels, and a kudu horn are joined by the chalice-like form of an incense burner and tealight holder from Brooklyn-based Apparatus along with a streamlined incense burner from Cinnamon Projects.

From the L.A. Library: Five Essential Volumes

1

City of Quartz by Mike Davis (Verso)
Penetrate “Fortress L.A.” in this unparalleled reconstruction of the city’s shadow history and dissection of its ethereal economy.

2

Wallpaper* City Guide Los Angeles (Phaidon)
Tightly edited and discreetly packaged, this photo-laden paperback is a passport to the best of L.A.

3

I’m Losing You by Bruce Wagner (Plume)
Dial into Wagner’s intoxicating “cell phone trilogy” with this luminous, savage novel of the dystopia known as Hollywood.

4

They Called Her Styrene by Ed Ruscha (Phaidon)
The artist has the final word(s) on L.A. and much more in this thick block of a book that is an art object in itself.

5

Eames by Gloria Koenig (Taschen)
An illustrated primer on the the husband-and-wife team that transformed the visual character of America. A must read before making a pilgrimage to their iconic house in Pacific Palisades.

Among the quintessential goods on offer are new additions that embody the native ethos and aesthetic, including the timeless bags of local designer Agnes Baddoo and delicate jewelry from Kathleen Whitaker. NewbarK’s versatile loafers and chic sandals are a natural fit for the temperate climes of southern California, and the local brand has crafted a new shearling slide that is exclusive to The Line. In addition, hand-thrown ceramics from the Echo Park studio of California native Victoria Morris are placed throughout The Apartment.

A tremendous amount of thought, care, and inspiration have made the L.A. Apartment a space unlike any other: a place to connect, commune, and ground oneself in a sprawling city. In the weeks and months ahead, The Apartment will play host to a diverse series of events, from dinners and cocktail hours, to visits from featured designers, artists and artisans, making the most of the many facets of this fully functional living space.

Dressed in Tenfold washed linen sheeting and topped with a cashmere throw and accent pillows, Doug McCollough’s linoleum-paneled, birch-frame platform bed with attached side tables is the centerpiece of the bedroom, which is illuminated by a Parentesi light by Achille Castiglioni and Pio Manzu for FLOS and a bedside Grashoppa lamp by Greta Grossman. The black rattan rocking chair beneath a cozy sheepskin throw is a 1969 design by Nanna Ditzel and the works over the bed are by Hungarian designer György Kepes.