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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Workwear Update:
New Dress Codes with LOROD

Cover

By Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Jon Ervin

Dress codes—the required dress of academic and professional institutions—ought to be rewritten for the modern métier. For this, we like the idea of modular sets, and so does Lauren Rodriguez and Michael Freels of New York-based LOROD. Their “modular, modern interpretations of American classics” are inspired by vintage utility, workwear, and “art somewhere between 1950-1970,” the designers say, from artists like William Eggleston, Dorothea Lange, and Rauschenberg—each who captured Americans at work. Today’s working America? It’s more fluid than ever—particularly when it comes to titles and codes. Here are merely a few suggestions, as codified by the multi-disciplinary designer Camilla Deterre.

CEO/FTE

Our CEO (chief executive officer) or FTE (full-time employee) comes dressed-for-success in a virgin wool overcoat with a peaked lapel. Ready for B2B (business to business) relations, legal proceedings, an IPO (initial public offering), or key note speech—nothing seals the deal like a tailored overcoat borrowed from the Madmen of yesteryear.

OOO/WFH

Camilla is, like so many up-and-comers in Manhattan, a remote worker OOO (out of office) and WFH (working from home) most of the time. An accomplished model and designer, Camilla’s second restaurant interior (her first is Mimi on Sullivan Street) is PRIMOS in Tribeca, New York. About her design approach, Camilla says: “It starts with having a concept for what kind of restaurant or bar it is, what culture points it wants to speak to, and how it wants to make people feel. It feels good to make room for people to enjoy themselves, to step outside their gridded lives and into a new reality, for a moment.”

Versatility is essential for the OOO woman, and LOROD’s chore jacket and relaxed trouser look is the perfect match. The bright rust-colored set moves fluidly from bedside to a meet-up space. LOROD’s Lauren Rodriguez is originally from California and Michael Freels is from rural Indiana, and with their penchant for American vintage, it only makes sense to manufacture in the US. That’s for two reasons, says Lauren, “we’re committed to sampling and manufacturing our garments in the US to preserve the New York garment district, and this allows us direct oversight to ensure high quality garments.” That’s QA (quality assurance) at its best.

PhD/MD

The scientist or professor holding a PhD (director of philosophy), like the MD (doctor of medicine), needs polish and simplicity for her daily agenda. A cotton poplin shirtdress does the job adequately, looking especially smart with a pair of Manolo Blahniks for LOROD (a forthcoming design for Fall). The flared cut and western-inspired snap fastening here shows the designers’ expert reinterpretation of a classic. “It allows your wardrobe more longevity,” they say. “You don’t feel the need to purge your closet every season.”

The LOROD woman is laid back and carefully considered. She represents unwavering poise and stoicism.LOROD
MFA/MA

Whether an art handler or artist, our MFA (master of fine art) or MA (master of art) woman is well-suited for the job in a soft denim chore jacket and trouser. Deep patch pockets on both are for loose things like brushes, pencils, screws, nails, and the like. The look represents LOROD’s inspiration for their pre-fall collection referencing the Dust Bowl era (1931-39) through the mid-seventies to “interpret the American West in a way that feels modern and fresh.” Looks as good on the rancher as it does on the Manhattan artist.

R&D/BD

Our BD (business development) or R&D (research & development) woman is everything from a gallerist and curator to a collector and purveyor. The daily program is full of social events—par for the course in her métier—and the perfect dress is the kind to bounce between each in. Like the chore jacket before, a classic pinafore dress can also be seen as workwear for the modern woman. Here the style is rendered with a square neckline and flared skirt cut in fine virgin wool. The look is delivered with white glove service.

Powered by Assembled Brands
Styling Gabrielle Marcecca
Hair Yasuke Miura
Makeup Rei Tajima
Model Camilla Deterre

»Shop all Fashion

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Capture One: Style Selects with Frances de Lourdes

Workwear Update: New Dress Codes with LOROD

Workwear Update:
New Dress Codes with LOROD

Cover

By Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Jon Ervin

Dress codes—the required dress of academic and professional institutions—ought to be rewritten for the modern métier. For this, we like the idea of modular sets, and so does Lauren Rodriguez and Michael Freels of New York-based LOROD. Their “modular, modern interpretations of American classics” are inspired by vintage utility, workwear, and “art somewhere between 1950-1970,” the designers say, from artists like William Eggleston, Dorothea Lange, and Rauschenberg—each who captured Americans at work. Today’s working America? It’s more fluid than ever—particularly when it comes to titles and codes. Here are merely a few suggestions, as codified by the multi-disciplinary designer Camilla Deterre.

CEO/FTE

Our CEO (chief executive officer) or FTE (full-time employee) comes dressed-for-success in a virgin wool overcoat with a peaked lapel. Ready for B2B (business to business) relations, legal proceedings, an IPO (initial public offering), or key note speech—nothing seals the deal like a tailored overcoat borrowed from the Madmen of yesteryear.

OOO/WFH

Camilla is, like so many up-and-comers in Manhattan, a remote worker OOO (out of office) and WFH (working from home) most of the time. An accomplished model and designer, Camilla’s second restaurant interior (her first is Mimi on Sullivan Street) is PRIMOS in Tribeca, New York. About her design approach, Camilla says: “It starts with having a concept for what kind of restaurant or bar it is, what culture points it wants to speak to, and how it wants to make people feel. It feels good to make room for people to enjoy themselves, to step outside their gridded lives and into a new reality, for a moment.”

Versatility is essential for the OOO woman, and LOROD’s chore jacket and relaxed trouser look is the perfect match. The bright rust-colored set moves fluidly from bedside to a meet-up space. LOROD’s Lauren Rodriguez is originally from California and Michael Freels is from rural Indiana, and with their penchant for American vintage, it only makes sense to manufacture in the US. That’s for two reasons, says Lauren, “we’re committed to sampling and manufacturing our garments in the US to preserve the New York garment district, and this allows us direct oversight to ensure high quality garments.” That’s QA (quality assurance) at its best.

PhD/MD

The scientist or professor holding a PhD (director of philosophy), like the MD (doctor of medicine), needs polish and simplicity for her daily agenda. A cotton poplin shirtdress does the job adequately, looking especially smart with a pair of Manolo Blahniks for LOROD (a forthcoming design for Fall). The flared cut and western-inspired snap fastening here shows the designers’ expert reinterpretation of a classic. “It allows your wardrobe more longevity,” they say. “You don’t feel the need to purge your closet every season.”

The LOROD woman is laid back and carefully considered. She represents unwavering poise and stoicism.LOROD
MFA/MA

Whether an art handler or artist, our MFA (master of fine art) or MA (master of art) woman is well-suited for the job in a soft denim chore jacket and trouser. Deep patch pockets on both are for loose things like brushes, pencils, screws, nails, and the like. The look represents LOROD’s inspiration for their pre-fall collection referencing the Dust Bowl era (1931-39) through the mid-seventies to “interpret the American West in a way that feels modern and fresh.” Looks as good on the rancher as it does on the Manhattan artist.

R&D/BD

Our BD (business development) or R&D (research & development) woman is everything from a gallerist and curator to a collector and purveyor. The daily program is full of social events—par for the course in her métier—and the perfect dress is the kind to bounce between each in. Like the chore jacket before, a classic pinafore dress can also be seen as workwear for the modern woman. Here the style is rendered with a square neckline and flared skirt cut in fine virgin wool. The look is delivered with white glove service.

Powered by Assembled Brands
Styling Gabrielle Marcecca
Hair Yasuke Miura
Makeup Rei Tajima
Model Camilla Deterre

»Shop all Fashion

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Capture One: Style Selects with Frances de Lourdes