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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Home Fabrics:
Fashion’s Plated Palette

by Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

The prolificacy of the home decorator is a thing of the past. Printed fabric rolled across the floor, swatches of upholstery littered over furniture, paint cards tacked to the wall, and decisions made in under an hour are, today, thoroughly unstylish. Taking its place is the personalized interior, developed over time and with a new depth of consideration. The modern home—and wardrobe—says as much about a person as their kept bookshelf titles and academic pedigree. The key is to assemble the tricks of professionals with the intimacy of one’s own style—and to have fun while doing it. This season, fashion houses turn to the yardage stores of home decorators for resurrected fabrics in eccentric patterns and saturated color. Here, plated among vegetables, fall fabrics are auditioned at the table—the only place where palette meets palate.

A splendid tablecloth or a Baroque dress? Fashions blur boundaries with the use of brocades, jacquards, florals, and paisley.

Here, a colorscape in the spirit of photographer Nickolas Muray—who shot features for McCall’s and Holiday magazines in the 1940s and 50s. Domestic scenes of technicolor tabletops and garnished still lifes (think concentric circles of pink shrimp and skewered fruit) mark his work as seen in Feast for the Eyes by Susan Bright.

The tables are laden, the sideboards are heaving, and everything is on show. Susan Bright on Betty Crocker’s Picture Cookbook from 1954 as told to Vogue magazine
A vibrant blue jacquard dress from Loewe is evocative of both an heirloom garment and hotelier’s finest linen. A Dolce & Gabbana dress with stamps of roses on Calamine pink has the charm of vintage fabric.

The appeal of home fabrics—the prints and textures seen in European and American households for centuries—is their familiar-feeling quality. With these fabrics, designed and modified for modern silhouettes, this season is telling us one thing: be your own decorator.

»Shop all Fashion

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Building the Lily: FLoral Fragrances Reimagined

Home Fabrics: Fashion’s Plated Palette

Home Fabrics:
Fashion’s Plated Palette

by Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

The prolificacy of the home decorator is a thing of the past. Printed fabric rolled across the floor, swatches of upholstery littered over furniture, paint cards tacked to the wall, and decisions made in under an hour are, today, thoroughly unstylish. Taking its place is the personalized interior, developed over time and with a new depth of consideration. The modern home—and wardrobe—says as much about a person as their kept bookshelf titles and academic pedigree. The key is to assemble the tricks of professionals with the intimacy of one’s own style—and to have fun while doing it. This season, fashion houses turn to the yardage stores of home decorators for resurrected fabrics in eccentric patterns and saturated color. Here, plated among vegetables, fall fabrics are auditioned at the table—the only place where palette meets palate.

A splendid tablecloth or a Baroque dress? Fashions blur boundaries with the use of brocades, jacquards, florals, and paisley.

Here, a colorscape in the spirit of photographer Nickolas Muray—who shot features for McCall’s and Holiday magazines in the 1940s and 50s. Domestic scenes of technicolor tabletops and garnished still lifes (think concentric circles of pink shrimp and skewered fruit) mark his work as seen in Feast for the Eyes by Susan Bright.

The tables are laden, the sideboards are heaving, and everything is on show. Susan Bright on Betty Crocker’s Picture Cookbook from 1954 as told to Vogue magazine
A vibrant blue jacquard dress from Loewe is evocative of both an heirloom garment and hotelier’s finest linen. A Dolce & Gabbana dress with stamps of roses on Calamine pink has the charm of vintage fabric.

The appeal of home fabrics—the prints and textures seen in European and American households for centuries—is their familiar-feeling quality. With these fabrics, designed and modified for modern silhouettes, this season is telling us one thing: be your own decorator.

»Shop all Fashion

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Building the Lily: FLoral Fragrances Reimagined