Your bag is currently empty.
my bag
  • Size:
QTY :
PRICE
remove
The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

x

Now Serving:
The Eclectic Holiday Table

by Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

This holiday season, embrace eclecticism. Scrap the fine china and eschew the expected for a new approach to tabletop decor. Here’s the formula: pull objects from around the house. Gather them in the middle of your table and take stock. Glassware from Sweden, silver from Denmark, lucite from France, pyrite from Peru, horn from Uganda. The modern table (and kitchen) is distinctly global with encyclopedic influences for a more assorted—and artful—arrangement.

Swedish crystal from designer Deborah Ehrlich is as clear as water. Black soapstone, pulled from the freezer, is a quirky alternative to ice fit for purists.

A fluted oeuvre from Chicago-based designer Felicia Ferrone of Fferrone. Made of Czech borosilicate glass, the talise pairs with a standard Brita to filter water in the kitchen and bring to the table. Pair with a slender wine carafe and stubby glasses—also fluted—for a modern approach to serving wine.

Fluted glass is an instant heirloom, gold tone flatware a distinctive choice, and rarefied antiques all inform the modern eclectic table.

Gilded servers from Mepra, the three-generations-old Italian flatware manufacturer, is made with enduring (scratch resistant) gold-tone titanium.

From Kingston, New York, blackline boards are made from a single piece of white oak and finished by way of the wood’s own natural reactive tannic acid. The boards are useful for kitchen prep and carry over to the table for serving.

An unexpected detail, vintage sterling silver salt and pepper shakers have a curious shape. It’s that one unidentifiable element on the table that keeps even the most design-informed guest guessing.

Never scrimp on the kitchen arsenal. Coltellerie Berti’s lucite handle knives have been made in France since 1895; functional for the kitchen and appealing for the table.

For that piece of holiday gleam—done well—a Peruvian pyrite object doubles as a spoon rest. And not just any spoon, it’s a gold-plated Italian demitasse.

Shallow measuring cups in brass are reminiscent of antique Swedish cookware (but from Danish company Ferm Living). Good for leveling off gobs of baking soda or, separated out, as serving scoops on the table.

Nothing finishes the meal quite like stainless steel espresso cups from Danish silversmiths Georg Jensen. The pint-sized design pairs Japanese tea traditions with a European sensibility.

»Shop all home

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:

Now Serving: The Eclectic Holiday Table

Now Serving:
The Eclectic Holiday Table

by Alexa Hotz
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

This holiday season, embrace eclecticism. Scrap the fine china and eschew the expected for a new approach to tabletop decor. Here’s the formula: pull objects from around the house. Gather them in the middle of your table and take stock. Glassware from Sweden, silver from Denmark, lucite from France, pyrite from Peru, horn from Uganda. The modern table (and kitchen) is distinctly global with encyclopedic influences for a more assorted—and artful—arrangement.

Swedish crystal from designer Deborah Ehrlich is as clear as water. Black soapstone, pulled from the freezer, is a quirky alternative to ice fit for purists.

A fluted oeuvre from Chicago-based designer Felicia Ferrone of Fferrone. Made of Czech borosilicate glass, the talise pairs with a standard Brita to filter water in the kitchen and bring to the table. Pair with a slender wine carafe and stubby glasses—also fluted—for a modern approach to serving wine.

Fluted glass is an instant heirloom, gold tone flatware a distinctive choice, and rarefied antiques all inform the modern eclectic table.

Gilded servers from Mepra, the three-generations-old Italian flatware manufacturer, is made with enduring (scratch resistant) gold-tone titanium.

From Kingston, New York, blackline boards are made from a single piece of white oak and finished by way of the wood’s own natural reactive tannic acid. The boards are useful for kitchen prep and carry over to the table for serving.

An unexpected detail, vintage sterling silver salt and pepper shakers have a curious shape. It’s that one unidentifiable element on the table that keeps even the most design-informed guest guessing.

Never scrimp on the kitchen arsenal. Coltellerie Berti’s lucite handle knives have been made in France since 1895; functional for the kitchen and appealing for the table.

For that piece of holiday gleam—done well—a Peruvian pyrite object doubles as a spoon rest. And not just any spoon, it’s a gold-plated Italian demitasse.

Shallow measuring cups in brass are reminiscent of antique Swedish cookware (but from Danish company Ferm Living). Good for leveling off gobs of baking soda or, separated out, as serving scoops on the table.

Nothing finishes the meal quite like stainless steel espresso cups from Danish silversmiths Georg Jensen. The pint-sized design pairs Japanese tea traditions with a European sensibility.

»Shop all home

»Explore another chapter in The Stories: