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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Free Spirit:
The Modern Vision of Charlotte Perriand

Architect and designer Charlotte Perriand (1903–1999) described her discipline as one of “equipping” interior spaces. Working with Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, she came to distrust all “ready-made formulas” in the quest for function and freedom, structure and play. “It wasn’t merely a question of designing and dreaming, but of showing and experimenting,” wrote Perriand. “‘Action not words,’ as Corbu said.”

“Furniture design is based on logical principles,” explained Perriand in 1928. “Needless prettifying must be avoided. Its beauty must come from the rational arrangement of its parts.” At top, Perriand reclines on the chaise longue she designed in 1928 with Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret (© Archives Charlotte Perriand). Above, a figure in repose wears a Lemaire dress (Photo by Charlie Schuck).

“Perriand used the whimsical expression ‘l’oeil en eventail’ (a wide-angle eye) to refer to an important aspect of her creative process,” according to Jacques Barsac, who seized upon the phrase as the title for a series of exhibitions devoted to Perriand’s photography. “It meant paying attention to every object, humble or striking, large or small, man-made or natural, and learning the lesson it had to teach.”

A dress by Gabriela Hearst picks up the pebble palette (Photos by Charlie Schuck).

In the 1930s, Perriand, artist Fernand Léger, and Pierre Jeanneret enjoyed weekend expeditions to the Normandy beaches. “We would fill our backpacks with treasures: pebbles, bits of shoes, lumps of wood riddled with holes, horsehair brushes—all smoothed and ennobled by the sea,” she recalled in her 1998 autobiography. “We sorted them, admiring them, soaking them in water to give them more of a shine, and taking photographs. We called it our art brut.”

At left, Perriand’s 1937 photograph of a passenger on a boat (© Succession Charlotte Perriand/ADAGP, Paris, 2011). At right, a contemporary homage in a Totême top Khaite jeans (Photo by Charlie Schuck).
Architecture is an ebb and flow between interior and exterior—a round-trip.Charlotte Perriand
“Often it just takes a single image or word for a creation to take shape,” noted Perriand, whose references ranged from trees and rocks to “the gleaming bodywork” of cars motoring along the Champs-Élysées. Pictured here, inside and outside: Proenza Schouler Wrap Cardigan, Protagonist Flare Skirt (Photos by Charlie Schuck).

A lover of the outdoors and of extreme sports, Perriand praised “space, light, the joy of creating and living in our century.” She often looked to nature for inspiration, exhilarating in the “vast, open spaces of solitude and whiteness” of snowy mountains. “Everything is linked,” explained Perriand, “the body and the mind; mankind and the world; the earth and the sky.”

Pictured with Le Corbusier in 1939, Perriand delights in a rocky readymade recliner. (© Fondation le Corbusier)

Free Spirit: The Modern Vision of Charlotte Perriand

Free Spirit:
The Modern Vision of Charlotte Perriand

Architect and designer Charlotte Perriand (1903–1999) described her discipline as one of “equipping” interior spaces. Working with Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, she came to distrust all “ready-made formulas” in the quest for function and freedom, structure and play. “It wasn’t merely a question of designing and dreaming, but of showing and experimenting,” wrote Perriand. “‘Action not words,’ as Corbu said.”

“Furniture design is based on logical principles,” explained Perriand in 1928. “Needless prettifying must be avoided. Its beauty must come from the rational arrangement of its parts.” At top, Perriand reclines on the chaise longue she designed in 1928 with Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret (© Archives Charlotte Perriand). Above, a figure in repose wears a Lemaire dress (Photo by Charlie Schuck).

“Perriand used the whimsical expression ‘l’oeil en eventail’ (a wide-angle eye) to refer to an important aspect of her creative process,” according to Jacques Barsac, who seized upon the phrase as the title for a series of exhibitions devoted to Perriand’s photography. “It meant paying attention to every object, humble or striking, large or small, man-made or natural, and learning the lesson it had to teach.”

A dress by Gabriela Hearst picks up the pebble palette (Photos by Charlie Schuck).

In the 1930s, Perriand, artist Fernand Léger, and Pierre Jeanneret enjoyed weekend expeditions to the Normandy beaches. “We would fill our backpacks with treasures: pebbles, bits of shoes, lumps of wood riddled with holes, horsehair brushes—all smoothed and ennobled by the sea,” she recalled in her 1998 autobiography. “We sorted them, admiring them, soaking them in water to give them more of a shine, and taking photographs. We called it our art brut.”

At left, Perriand’s 1937 photograph of a passenger on a boat (© Succession Charlotte Perriand/ADAGP, Paris, 2011). At right, a contemporary homage in a Totême top Khaite jeans (Photo by Charlie Schuck).
Architecture is an ebb and flow between interior and exterior—a round-trip.Charlotte Perriand
“Often it just takes a single image or word for a creation to take shape,” noted Perriand, whose references ranged from trees and rocks to “the gleaming bodywork” of cars motoring along the Champs-Élysées. Pictured here, inside and outside: Proenza Schouler Wrap Cardigan, Protagonist Flare Skirt (Photos by Charlie Schuck).

A lover of the outdoors and of extreme sports, Perriand praised “space, light, the joy of creating and living in our century.” She often looked to nature for inspiration, exhilarating in the “vast, open spaces of solitude and whiteness” of snowy mountains. “Everything is linked,” explained Perriand, “the body and the mind; mankind and the world; the earth and the sky.”

Pictured with Le Corbusier in 1939, Perriand delights in a rocky readymade recliner. (© Fondation le Corbusier)