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The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Up for Auction:
The Contemporary Appeal of the Rockefeller Collection

Cover

by Thomas Sweeney
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

On May 8th, 9th, and 10th, the estate sale of the late philanthropists David and Peggy Rockefeller will be hosted by the international auction house Christie’s at its New York City flagship. The couple’s 2,000-piece collection of rare paintings, porcelain, jewelry, furniture, and decorative objects will make for the largest and, quite possibly, most profitable art auction of all time. (Such treasures as Picasso’s Young Girl with a Basket of Flowers, which was originally owned by Gertrude Stein, could fetch at least $100 million.) At the request of David and Peggy prior to their passing, all proceeds from the sale will, in true Rockefeller style, be divided among 15 philanthropic organizations.

In preparation for the auction, Christie’s has underlined the contemporary and cross-cultural appeal of the Rockefellers’ collection, even pointing out, for example, the feng-shui capabilities of the couple’s Monet, titled Nymphéas en fleur. The timeless nature of the pieces, according to Christie’s, is due in no small part to the Rockefellers’ avoidance of ostentation, as well as to their fondness for functionality. These are, after all, collectors who mounted 12th- and 13th-century Chinese pottery to use as lamps.

But not only do the Rockefellers’ acquisitions warrant pride of place in a 21st-century interior. They also fit seamlessly beside modern fashion, a functional art form in itself. To illustrate this, Christie’s and The Line have collaborated on an exclusive photoshoot that pairs a selection of porcelain, jewelry, furniture, and objects from the Rockefeller collection with a range of pieces currently offered by The Line. In the melodious images, each of the couple’s items, no matter its date of origin, appears to transcend time. What’s more, not a few of them pop from the page with a youngish spirit.

Aristide Maillol’s bronze Monument à Claude Debussy, with its ample, sensuous curves, doubles effortlessly as a stand for Proenza Schouler’s streamlined nappa-leather carryall.

A pair of George III giltwood window benches, for instance, boast a rosy leaf-patterned upholstery that provides a color-coordinated resting place for Manolo Blahnik’s “Sissavy” nude-suede slide, its transparent vamp adorned with one of Peggy’s faux-pearl clip-on earrings (which, at first glance, appears to be part of Mr. Blahnik’s design). Aristide Maillol’s bronze Monument à Claude Debussy, with its ample, sensuous curves, doubles effortlessly as a stand for Proenza Schouler’s streamlined nappa-leather carryall. And an 18th-century Chelsea-porcelain figurine, emblematic of the spring season, sits on a circular anchor that mirrors the Modernist shape of Sophie Buhai’s sterling-silver disc earrings.


Porcelain was of particular importance to David, especially as it related to entertaining: certain friends who frequented his and Peggy’s estates claim that, as guests, they never ate from the same dish twice. In this photo series, a fox-head-shaped stirrup cup and a Capodimonte-style vase, shot before a clean backdrop, exhibit David’s affinity for restrained (but sometimes playful) tastes in matters of porcelain. World travel was also a passion of the civic-minded couple; they collected mementos at seemingly every stop. Here, a rust-toned house board from Papua New Guinea sits logically beside a V-shaped abstract wood sculpture from Collected by The Line, the store’s range of exclusive hand-sourced home goods.

The enduring aesthetic relevance of the Rockefellers’ collection, illuminated in these six photos, was crystal clear to the couple during their lifetime. David once said, “Eventually, all these objects, which have brought so much pleasure to Peggy and me, will go out into the world and will again be available to other caretakers who, hopefully, will derive the same satisfaction and joy from them as we have.” Next week, as the gavel falls at Christie’s, that new generation of caretakers will be determined. And with a collection this vast, comprehensive, and, above all, eternal, they’ll likely be found on every corner of the globe.

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»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Indoor Gardening: Harness The Hidden Power of Houseplants

Up for Auction: The Contemporary Appeal of the Rockefeller Collection

Up for Auction:
The Contemporary Appeal of the Rockefeller Collection

Cover

by Thomas Sweeney
Photographed by Hanna Tveite

On May 8th, 9th, and 10th, the estate sale of the late philanthropists David and Peggy Rockefeller will be hosted by the international auction house Christie’s at its New York City flagship. The couple’s 2,000-piece collection of rare paintings, porcelain, jewelry, furniture, and decorative objects will make for the largest and, quite possibly, most profitable art auction of all time. (Such treasures as Picasso’s Young Girl with a Basket of Flowers, which was originally owned by Gertrude Stein, could fetch at least $100 million.) At the request of David and Peggy prior to their passing, all proceeds from the sale will, in true Rockefeller style, be divided among 15 philanthropic organizations.

In preparation for the auction, Christie’s has underlined the contemporary and cross-cultural appeal of the Rockefellers’ collection, even pointing out, for example, the feng-shui capabilities of the couple’s Monet, titled Nymphéas en fleur. The timeless nature of the pieces, according to Christie’s, is due in no small part to the Rockefellers’ avoidance of ostentation, as well as to their fondness for functionality. These are, after all, collectors who mounted 12th- and 13th-century Chinese pottery to use as lamps.

But not only do the Rockefellers’ acquisitions warrant pride of place in a 21st-century interior. They also fit seamlessly beside modern fashion, a functional art form in itself. To illustrate this, Christie’s and The Line have collaborated on an exclusive photoshoot that pairs a selection of porcelain, jewelry, furniture, and objects from the Rockefeller collection with a range of pieces currently offered by The Line. In the melodious images, each of the couple’s items, no matter its date of origin, appears to transcend time. What’s more, not a few of them pop from the page with a youngish spirit.

Aristide Maillol’s bronze Monument à Claude Debussy, with its ample, sensuous curves, doubles effortlessly as a stand for Proenza Schouler’s streamlined nappa-leather carryall.

A pair of George III giltwood window benches, for instance, boast a rosy leaf-patterned upholstery that provides a color-coordinated resting place for Manolo Blahnik’s “Sissavy” nude-suede slide, its transparent vamp adorned with one of Peggy’s faux-pearl clip-on earrings (which, at first glance, appears to be part of Mr. Blahnik’s design). Aristide Maillol’s bronze Monument à Claude Debussy, with its ample, sensuous curves, doubles effortlessly as a stand for Proenza Schouler’s streamlined nappa-leather carryall. And an 18th-century Chelsea-porcelain figurine, emblematic of the spring season, sits on a circular anchor that mirrors the Modernist shape of Sophie Buhai’s sterling-silver disc earrings.


Porcelain was of particular importance to David, especially as it related to entertaining: certain friends who frequented his and Peggy’s estates claim that, as guests, they never ate from the same dish twice. In this photo series, a fox-head-shaped stirrup cup and a Capodimonte-style vase, shot before a clean backdrop, exhibit David’s affinity for restrained (but sometimes playful) tastes in matters of porcelain. World travel was also a passion of the civic-minded couple; they collected mementos at seemingly every stop. Here, a rust-toned house board from Papua New Guinea sits logically beside a V-shaped abstract wood sculpture from Collected by The Line, the store’s range of exclusive hand-sourced home goods.

The enduring aesthetic relevance of the Rockefellers’ collection, illuminated in these six photos, was crystal clear to the couple during their lifetime. David once said, “Eventually, all these objects, which have brought so much pleasure to Peggy and me, will go out into the world and will again be available to other caretakers who, hopefully, will derive the same satisfaction and joy from them as we have.” Next week, as the gavel falls at Christie’s, that new generation of caretakers will be determined. And with a collection this vast, comprehensive, and, above all, eternal, they’ll likely be found on every corner of the globe.

Powered by Assembled Brands

»Shop all Home

»Explore another chapter in The Stories:
Indoor Gardening: Harness The Hidden Power of Houseplants