The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Autumn in New York:
Five Destinations for a Perfect Fall

Seeking the best a particular city has to offer? Ask the locals. That truism gets a high-tech, high-style upgrade with Citiphile, the digital city guide founded by Alexandra Geisler. The former fashion journalist convinces leading designers, photographers, stylists, and other creative types to reveal their favorite places and spaces in the neighborhoods they know best, from the Lower East Side to Laurel Canyon. “These leading voices in design care about everything that goes into an ‘experience,’” she says. “It’s not just the quality of the food, but it’s the design of the space, the energy, and the crowd, too.” With fall in full swing, we asked Geisler to share some of her favorite ways to enjoy New York.

NO. 1

Raoul’s

Opened in 1975 by Alsatian brothers Serge and Guy Raoul, this family-run French bistro is a SoHo institution. Steak au poivre is the signature dish, but chef David Honeysett is also renowned for his lobster risotto and seafood fricassee.

“There’s something about the cool, brisk air of autumn that makes me crave a good burger and glass of red wine,” says Geisler. “My fiancé and I are pretty serious about burgers, and Raoul’s’ burger beats out all of them. Offered at the bar only, theirs is coated au poivre-style, topped with triple cream cheese, red onion, cornichons, and watercress, and is served with a cognac-au poivre dipping sauce and duck-fat fries. The old-school SoHo spot serves just twelve of them a night—one per bar stool—so arriving early is a must, but once your seat is secured, you can linger over a bottle of Pinot, then place your order when hunger strikes.”
180 Prince Street, SoHo

“The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened its modern and contemporary art annex, The Met Breuer, this past spring, and I’m especially enamored with its current exhibit, In the Beginning, featuring the early work of one of my all-time favorite photographers, Diane Arbus,” she explains. “The museum is just one block from Central Park, so a visit to the show, followed by a walk through the soon-to-be crimson-and-orange-colored park feels like the perfect autumn ode to both artist and city.”
945 Madison Avenue, Upper East Side

NO. 2

The Met Breuer

On view through November 27th at the Met Breuer, Diane Arbus: In the Beginning presents each photograph on its own individual wall. The effect is akin to that of the chance street encounters that so delighted Arbus. (© The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.Diane Arbus

NO. 3

King

Opened in September, King specializes in sublime subtlety. Chefs Clare de Boer and Jess Shadbolt—alums of London’s River Café—serve up simple yet elegant dishes influenced by the south of France and Northern Italy. The intimate bistro is made all the more delightful by artist Robert Alvarez’s illustrations and typography.

“I’m getting married in Provence next June, so there may be some sentimental value here, but the new Provençal-style restaurant King was one of the fall openings I was most looking forward to,” notes Geisler. “It’s a cozy space with Matisse-like graphics, white-washed brick, and Thonet chairs. The seasonal menu changes daily, but its beautiful fish stew with lobster, clams, and fluke is a kitchen staple and for good reason. This little gem begs for date night.”
18 King Street, SoHo

NO. 4

Glenmere

In 1911, industrialist Robert Wilson Goelet (1881–1940) commissioned the architectural firm of Carrère and Hastings to create a mansion reminiscent of the villas that had enchanted him in Tuscany. Landscape architect Beatrix Farrand was called upon to create the extraordinary Glenmere Gardens, much of which remains to this day.

“I’m almost hesitant to recommend it because it’s our little slice of quiet paradise, but we discovered the Glenmere a few years ago when looking for a weekend getaway not too far from the city,” she says. “The staff is so kind, the décor is exquisite, and the on-site spa is absolutely lovely. The hotel restaurant is nice, but I’d recommend venturing off property to the Grange, an unassuming, mom-and-pop restaurant with some of the best farm-to-table food I’ve ever had.”
634 Pine Hill Road, Chester, New York

Glenmere is only about an hour-and-a-half drive from Manhattan, though spend just one night there and I promise you’ll feel worlds away.Alexandria Geisler

NO. 5

Attaboy

In the great tradition of Manhattan speakeasies, Attaboy lays low, behind an unmarked steel door. Knock or buzz, and then prepare to experience the bespoke beverage of your dreams.

“I’m not sure I’ll ever come across another cocktail bar as great as Attaboy. Small and dimly-lit, it’s everything you want in an intimate night out, and it employs the most incredible mixologists,” says Geisler. “There is no drink menu—not as a gimmick or trend, but because your own mood, energy, and tastes are meant to inspire your cocktail. They do name each drink they serve, however, so go often enough and you’ll start to remember your favorites. If Japanese whiskey and cacao sounds like your idea of a good time, order the Harajuku. You won’t be sorry.”
134 Eldridge Street, Lower East Side

Autumn in New York: Five Destinations for a Perfect Fall

Autumn in New York:
Five Destinations for a Perfect Fall

Seeking the best a particular city has to offer? Ask the locals. That truism gets a high-tech, high-style upgrade with Citiphile, the digital city guide founded by Alexandra Geisler. The former fashion journalist convinces leading designers, photographers, stylists, and other creative types to reveal their favorite places and spaces in the neighborhoods they know best, from the Lower East Side to Laurel Canyon. “These leading voices in design care about everything that goes into an ‘experience,’” she says. “It’s not just the quality of the food, but it’s the design of the space, the energy, and the crowd, too.” With fall in full swing, we asked Geisler to share some of her favorite ways to enjoy New York.

NO. 1

Raoul’s

Opened in 1975 by Alsatian brothers Serge and Guy Raoul, this family-run French bistro is a SoHo institution. Steak au poivre is the signature dish, but chef David Honeysett is also renowned for his lobster risotto and seafood fricassee.

“There’s something about the cool, brisk air of autumn that makes me crave a good burger and glass of red wine,” says Geisler. “My fiancé and I are pretty serious about burgers, and Raoul’s’ burger beats out all of them. Offered at the bar only, theirs is coated au poivre-style, topped with triple cream cheese, red onion, cornichons, and watercress, and is served with a cognac-au poivre dipping sauce and duck-fat fries. The old-school SoHo spot serves just twelve of them a night—one per bar stool—so arriving early is a must, but once your seat is secured, you can linger over a bottle of Pinot, then place your order when hunger strikes.”
180 Prince Street, SoHo

“The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened its modern and contemporary art annex, The Met Breuer, this past spring, and I’m especially enamored with its current exhibit, In the Beginning, featuring the early work of one of my all-time favorite photographers, Diane Arbus,” she explains. “The museum is just one block from Central Park, so a visit to the show, followed by a walk through the soon-to-be crimson-and-orange-colored park feels like the perfect autumn ode to both artist and city.”
945 Madison Avenue, Upper East Side

NO. 2

The Met Breuer

On view through November 27th at the Met Breuer, Diane Arbus: In the Beginning presents each photograph on its own individual wall. The effect is akin to that of the chance street encounters that so delighted Arbus. (© The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.Diane Arbus

NO. 3

King

Opened in September, King specializes in sublime subtlety. Chefs Clare de Boer and Jess Shadbolt—alums of London’s River Café—serve up simple yet elegant dishes influenced by the south of France and Northern Italy. The intimate bistro is made all the more delightful by artist Robert Alvarez’s illustrations and typography.

“I’m getting married in Provence next June, so there may be some sentimental value here, but the new Provençal-style restaurant King was one of the fall openings I was most looking forward to,” notes Geisler. “It’s a cozy space with Matisse-like graphics, white-washed brick, and Thonet chairs. The seasonal menu changes daily, but its beautiful fish stew with lobster, clams, and fluke is a kitchen staple and for good reason. This little gem begs for date night.”
18 King Street, SoHo

NO. 4

Glenmere

In 1911, industrialist Robert Wilson Goelet (1881–1940) commissioned the architectural firm of Carrère and Hastings to create a mansion reminiscent of the villas that had enchanted him in Tuscany. Landscape architect Beatrix Farrand was called upon to create the extraordinary Glenmere Gardens, much of which remains to this day.

“I’m almost hesitant to recommend it because it’s our little slice of quiet paradise, but we discovered the Glenmere a few years ago when looking for a weekend getaway not too far from the city,” she says. “The staff is so kind, the décor is exquisite, and the on-site spa is absolutely lovely. The hotel restaurant is nice, but I’d recommend venturing off property to the Grange, an unassuming, mom-and-pop restaurant with some of the best farm-to-table food I’ve ever had.”
634 Pine Hill Road, Chester, New York

Glenmere is only about an hour-and-a-half drive from Manhattan, though spend just one night there and I promise you’ll feel worlds away.Alexandria Geisler

NO. 5

Attaboy

In the great tradition of Manhattan speakeasies, Attaboy lays low, behind an unmarked steel door. Knock or buzz, and then prepare to experience the bespoke beverage of your dreams.

“I’m not sure I’ll ever come across another cocktail bar as great as Attaboy. Small and dimly-lit, it’s everything you want in an intimate night out, and it employs the most incredible mixologists,” says Geisler. “There is no drink menu—not as a gimmick or trend, but because your own mood, energy, and tastes are meant to inspire your cocktail. They do name each drink they serve, however, so go often enough and you’ll start to remember your favorites. If Japanese whiskey and cacao sounds like your idea of a good time, order the Harajuku. You won’t be sorry.”
134 Eldridge Street, Lower East Side