The Line Style in Context

The Line is a modern and personal approach to retail. We bring together carefully chosen fashion, home, and beauty items and place them in context through inspiring editorial features and intimate offline shopping experiences. The thematic, seasonal, and handpicked assortments we call Selections offer another way to explore our evolving edit of things you’ll wear, use, and treasure for years to come.

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Selected by Julie Carlson:
Perfect Pieces for the Considered Home

Photo by Matthew Williams

“Classic and livable trumps trendy and transient.” This is the first rule of Remodelista. Launched in 2007 as a digital guide to the home design process, the website celebrates the personal and the meaningful, champions simplicity, and sifts through endless options. “It adds up to a desire to live well and thoughtfully,” says editor-in-chief Julie Carlson. From her home in Mill Valley, California, she reviewed the latest offerings of The Line and selected pieces that merit a place in “the considered home.”

Staying true to another Remodelista tenet—that “ordinary utilitarian items can and should be as pleasingly elegant as center-of-attention pieces”—Carlson is drawn to Carl Auböck’s brass hooks (“as pretty as jewelry”), ceramic vessels such as Tenfold’s splatter vase (“I love the offhand elegance of this piece, and you can never have too many vases”), and the hand-blown decanter created by Deborah Ehrlich for Blue Hill. A carafe-and-drinking glass combo designed for bedside use makes her list “because we’re obsessed with getting a good night’s sleep at Remodelista.”

Other bedroom favorites include the “elevated basics” of washed percale and washed linen sheeting, especially in appealingly “noirish” shades of carbon and graphite. Tenfold’s cashmere throw earns praise for its “tweedy tones” and “casual fringe,” while ribbed towels have practical appeal, particularly for the urban bath. “These Japanese towels are lightweight and less bulky,” explains Carlson, “which makes them easier to store.” And although less is usually more, she makes an exception for accent pillows, opting for three of the two-tone linen squares. “I’d mix one of each—slate, oatmeal, and fog—on my sofa.”

Selected by Julie Carlson: Perfect Pieces for the Considered Home

Selected by Julie Carlson:
Perfect Pieces for the Considered Home

Photo by Matthew Williams

“Classic and livable trumps trendy and transient.” This is the first rule of Remodelista. Launched in 2007 as a digital guide to the home design process, the website celebrates the personal and the meaningful, champions simplicity, and sifts through endless options. “It adds up to a desire to live well and thoughtfully,” says editor-in-chief Julie Carlson. From her home in Mill Valley, California, she reviewed the latest offerings of The Line and selected pieces that merit a place in “the considered home.”

Staying true to another Remodelista tenet—that “ordinary utilitarian items can and should be as pleasingly elegant as center-of-attention pieces”—Carlson is drawn to Carl Auböck’s brass hooks (“as pretty as jewelry”), ceramic vessels such as Tenfold’s splatter vase (“I love the offhand elegance of this piece, and you can never have too many vases”), and the hand-blown decanter created by Deborah Ehrlich for Blue Hill. A carafe-and-drinking glass combo designed for bedside use makes her list “because we’re obsessed with getting a good night’s sleep at Remodelista.”

Other bedroom favorites include the “elevated basics” of washed percale and washed linen sheeting, especially in appealingly “noirish” shades of carbon and graphite. Tenfold’s cashmere throw earns praise for its “tweedy tones” and “casual fringe,” while ribbed towels have practical appeal, particularly for the urban bath. “These Japanese towels are lightweight and less bulky,” explains Carlson, “which makes them easier to store.” And although less is usually more, she makes an exception for accent pillows, opting for three of the two-tone linen squares. “I’d mix one of each—slate, oatmeal, and fog—on my sofa.”